Covid Vaccine, fertility and pregnancy

Covid Vaccine, fertility and pregnancy

Update: July 28th 2021

We would like to provide our patients with the latest information about the safety of the Covid-19 vaccine in those planning to conceive as well as those already pregnant.

If you are trying to conceive, the latest scientific studies are very reassuring, showing that no evidence that the Covid-19 vaccines could negatively impact your fertility.

The British Fertility Society and Association of Reproductive Clinical Scientists

The British Fertility Society and Association of Reproductive Clinical Scientists have just published a very useful FAQ document in response to questions that patients have been asking about Covid-19 vaccines and fertility:

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG)

The Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists continues to advise all pregnant women to have the vaccine and we have no changes to make to our previous update on this topic.

 

American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM)

Studies recently published in June 2021 in Nature and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Journal, support the safety of the vaccine in women trying to conceive or having assisted reproduction and we would advise you to get the vaccine to protect you from Covid-19 if you are offered it.

There is also no reason to delay your fertility treatment after either the first or second dose of the vaccine and the second dose can be safely taken when you are pregnant. As the vaccine can cause some mild to moderate side-effects in some individuals for a few days, it is sensible to delay starting any fertility treatment for about a week after having either the first or second dose of the vaccine so you embark on treatment feeling at your best. Here is the link to the Covid Vaccine and fertility ASRM paper.

The two key take home messages published by the ASRM following this paper are:

 

‘In women, seropositivity to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein — whether from vaccination or COVID infection — does not prevent embryo implantation or early pregnancy development’.

“We hope that all reproductive-aged women will be more confident getting the COVID-19 vaccine, given Dr. Morris’s findings that the vaccine does not cause female sterility.”

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